The Spaces, Places, and Virtual Experiences Inspiring Us Right Now

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Installation view of Judd, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 1–July 11, 2020. Digital image © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Photo by Jonathan Muzika

The Spaces, Places, and Virtual
Experiences Inspiring Us Right Now

A couple seasons’ worth of practical projects (organizing closets and reconfiguring cabinets) and exacting activities (mastering bread baking and martini mixing) merits a sensory shake-up. Here, we’ve gathered six inspiring exhibits, online explorations, and safe in-person experiences to get your synapses firing.

ALEXANDRE BENJAMIN NAVET
AT VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

In partnership with our friends at Van Cleef & Arpels

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Visiting a beloved boutique the day a new collection drops is exciting. Finding that same space transformed, floor to ceiling, into a bright, blooming garden? Borderline transcendent. Particularly when the man behind the metamorphosis is Alexandre Benjamin Navet. To reimagine Van Cleef & Arpels’s Beverly Hills and New York flagship stores, the multidisciplinary French artist complemented the brand’s signature floral designs with three-dimensional cutouts, tile inlays and rugs swathed in patterns straight from his sketchbook, and sculptural vases—a motif often found in his work. The effect is a vibrant, graphic homage to a jewelry house as inspired by nature as Navet himself, and manna to art-starved eyeballs that have been housebound for months.

If you live near Van Cleef & Arpels’s Beverly Hills or New York flagships, the boutiques are safely open for business and following local guidelines. To learn more about the immersive experiences online, head to the Maison’s website.

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DONALD JUDD AT MOMA

DONALD JUDD AT MOMA

Installation view of Judd, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 1–July 11, 2020. Digital image © 2020 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Jonathan Muzikar

This MoMA retrospective is the first time in over thirty years the don’t-call-me-a-minimalist minimalist artist’s signature stacks, progression pieces, and box forms have been on view. Arranged chronologically, the exhibition lays out—across four gallery spaces—the evolution of Judd’s work, highlighting themes repeated throughout his career. Interacting with the big, bold sculptures, it’s hard not to notice the exhibition’s apt timing: The pieces demand space, and they often require precise placement, just like anyone leaving home these days. If you’d rather check them out from yours, MoMA has an amazing online experience that lets you view the galleries, listen to and watch interviews with Judd throughout the years, view images of his homes, and really wrap your head around his vision.

The Judd exhibition has been extended through January 2021 (lucky us). MoMA requires timed tickets purchased in advance online, and the museum is open at a limited capacity. For a virtual viewing experience, start here—and return often.

DONALD JUDD AT MOMADONALD JUDD AT MOMA

Top: Donald Judd. Untitled. 1991. Enameled aluminum, 59″ × 24′ 7¼″ × 65″ (150 × 750 × 165 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Bequest of Richard S. Zeisler and gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (both by exchange) and gift of Kathy Fuld, Agnes Gund, Patricia Cisneros, Doris Fisher, Mimi Haas, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, and Emily Spiegel. © 2019 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: John Wronn. Bottom: Donald Judd. Untitled. 1986. Douglas fir plywood and orange Plexiglas; six units, each 39⅜ × 39⅜ × 29½″ (100 × 100 × 75 cm), with 19 11/16″ (50 cm) intervals. Overall: 98½ × 157⅝ × 29½″ (250 × 400 × 75 cm). Marieluise Hessel Collection, Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale‑on‑Hudson, New York © 2020 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society, New York. Photo: © Chris Kendall

VIRTUAL TOURS OF GUCCI GARDEN

VIRTUAL TOURS OF GUCCI GARDEN

Photo courtesy of Gucci

For the first time, visiting Museo Gucci doesn’t require a trip to Florence, Italy. This online tour of the museum and garden—complete with chirping birds in the background—gives visitors a shopping fix and a crash course in the house’s history. The experience unfolds like a walk through any museum: Start by exploring three floors of artwork, archival pieces, stories, and videos that reflect a visit to the Alessandro Michele–curated space in the Piazza della Signoria. On your way out, exit through the gift shop: Gucci is giving virtual visitors access to buy clothing, accessories, and ephemera previously available onsite only. While you can’t buy the hemp-and-bamboo bag from the early ’60s on display in the Bagology gallery, you can hit the boutique to scoop up exclusive Gucci Garden goods, from tees and sweatshirts that reflect the secret garden theme to brocade Princetown slippers.

Right this way.

VIRTUAL TOURS OF GUCCI GARDENVIRTUAL TOURS OF GUCCI GARDEN

Photo courtesy of Gucci

KARA WALKER AT TATE MODERN

KARA WALKER AT TATE MODERN

Photo courtesy of Ben Fisher

If you’re in London, take in Walker’s extended exhibition at the Tate Modern, which centers around a thirteen-foot, four-tiered fountain sculpture. The scale, seamlessness, and skill on view are captivating, but understanding Walker’s allegory and intentions for the exhibit makes it even more meaningful. The larger-than-life work inspires a bigger conversation around public monuments—so it’s a particularly important show to take in right now. Also inspiring: Every piece was created using an environmentally conscious production process that favors recyclable and reusable nontoxic materials. If you can’t visit in person, check out the Tate’s website for interviews with the artist, a virtual exploration of the exhibit, and a guide for kids.

Book a timed ticket ahead of your visit (entry is free, and you can check out the Warhol exhibit and peep a Matisse in the same trip) or view from home here.

KARA WALKER AT TATE MODERNKARA WALKER AT TATE MODERNKARA WALKER AT TATE MODERN

Photos courtesy of Ben Fisher (top left) and Matt Greenwood (top right and bottom)

DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY
ONLINE EXHIBITIONS

DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY

Linda Stark, Hearts, David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, September 19–October 24, 2020, installation view. Photo: Elon Schoenholz

We love this Los Angeles gallery for its diverse, dynamic curation and cultural perspectives. From ceramics to sculptural installations, the catalog of exhibitions on David Kordansky Gallery’s website covers myriad mediums and points of view, but every single show feels fresh and modern. If you’ve found yourself constantly refreshing Instagram for inspiration, trust us: Get off the app and keep this tab at the ready. Between the viewing rooms, the exhibition pages, and the one-on-one artist videos, there are plenty of visual rabbit holes to get lost in. Angelenos can also look forward to checking out the gallery’s expanded art campus—a three-structure spread with a sculpture-filled courtyard and space for screenings, exhibits, and events when the time is right.

David Kordansky Gallery is currently open by appointment, with exhibitions by Linda Stark and Lesley Vance on view. To give the gallery a long-distance stroll, start here.

DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERYDAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY

Top: Linda Stark, Hearts, David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, September 19–October 24, 2020, installation view. Photo: Elon Schoenholz. Bottom: Lesley Vance, A Zebra Races Counterclockwise, David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, September 12–October 24, 2020, installation view. Photo: Jeff McLane

STORM KING ART CENTER OUTDOOR MUSEUM

STORM KING ART CENTER OUTDOOR MUSEUM

Ursula von Rydingsvard, Luba, 2009–10. Made possible through generous lead support from the artist, Roberta and Steven Denning, Galerie Lelong, Nancy Brown Negley, and The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston, and Thomas A. and Georgina T. Russo. Additional support is provided by an anonymous donor, the Hazen Polsky Foundation, the Ohnell Family Foundation, and Hume R. Steyer. Special thanks also go to Henry S. McNeil and Marion Swingle.

©Ursula von Rydingsvard, courtesy of Galerie Lelong, NY. Photo by Jerry L. Thompson

The best damn day-date in the game is even more refreshing these days, and worth the trip if you’re within driving distance of New York’s Hudson Valley. Storm King Art Center is currently open as an outdoor-only experience, with timed tickets going on sale every other Wednesday, and on the cusp of chunky-knits-and-changing-leaves season, they tend to sell out fast. Explore the 500-acre outdoor museum to take in the classics (Calder, Stella, Noguchi, and the gang) and the current exhibitions (including a flag installation by Kiki Smith and a ninety-two-foot sculpture by Mark di Suvero), while getting some safe, socially distanced fresh air.

Reserve timed tickets here.

STORM KING ART CENTER OUTDOOR MUSEUMSTORM KING ART CENTER OUTDOOR MUSEUM

Left: Mark di Suvero, Neruda’s Gate, 2005. © Mark di Suvero, courtesy of the artist and Spacetime C.C., NY. © Photo courtesy of Storm King Art Center. Right: Maya Lin, Storm King Wavefield, 2007–08. Gift of the Ralph E. Ogden Foundation, Janet Inskeep Benton, The Philip and Muriel Berman Foundation, The Brown Foundation Inc. of Houston, Texas, Amb. and Mrs. W. L. Lyons Brown, Jr., Callahan and Nannini Quarry Products, Charina Endowment Fund, The Donohue Family Foundation, Edmund G. Glass, the Hazen Polsky Fund, Paul and Barbara Jenkel, the Kautz Family Foundation, The Lipman Family Foundation, Martin Z. Margulies, Margaret T. Morris Foundation, Roy R. and Marie S. Neuberger Foundation, Inc., Peckham Family Foundation, Jeannette and David Redden, Gabrielle H. Reem, M.D. and Herbert J. Kayden, M.D., The Richard Salomon Family Foundation, Inc., Sara Lee and Alex H. Schupf, Anne and Constantine Sidamon-Eristoff, and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Smith. © Maya Lin Studio, courtesy of Pace Gallery. Photo by Jerry L. Thompson